Saturday, March 31, 2007

Saturday morning and the bloggers are angry...

Please just state your complaint and perhaps we will have the resources to develop your story idea further. That is what this blog was started for LISTENING, something I think we all agree is difficult for the media to do.

Yes, I know, I'm in a feisty mood today...

27 comments:

Anonymous said...

Since this is a "media" blog, let me lodge a complaint about the local news "media," then.

Neither the Town Talk nor KALB can claim to be a true "news" outlet in this market when incestuous relationships keep stories from happening.

How about the time a reporter was admonished by the person she was calling to ask about a high-profile employee's termination? That person called the TV station's general manager and insisted the story not be followed any further, and voila, the story was dead, despite it being news-worthy enough for the reporter AND the news director to have wanted to do the story in the first place.

Or how about the time when neither the Town Talk nor KALB would dig into a free-spending Alexandria Community Services division because it would upset the mayor? Tens of thousands of dollars (in city taxpayer funds) are used to hold "cookouts on steriods" essentially, to book entertainment far too costly for their draw, and no news outlet finds that to be a shocking waste of taxpayer funds. Odd. Streets remain pot-holed; utility bills remain outrageous due to city negligence, the polic department can't have the allotment of officers it truly needs, and yet the city used $90,000 to bring the Commodores to the levee in the spring of 2006. What's that, about 4 new police officers? Or $53,000 in 2007 to net $35,000 in ticket sales for "United We Funk" and Pat Green. What would $53,000 have gotten the city instead, in 2007? At least two more officers walking the streets, right?

Where are the JOURNALISTS in this town? And where are the BACKBONES to let 'em DO what JOURNALISTS are supposed to do? Get The Facts and Report 'em.

Anonymous said...

Ron, it's ashame you weren't able to do the media blitz you had hoped for, but you still linger on the local blogs in the hope that you can expose some non-existent corruption that only underscores how you simply don't understand what you're talking about.

Lisa Harris is a good, hard-working person who put together a festival that was more successful than any Riverfest ever was.

Thankfully, she also didn't listen to naysayers like you, when you called Pat Green a washed-up country artist. Considering he packed the place on Saturday night, I'd venture to say that he is actually popular, probably more popular than you ever knew.

Maybe you would have known that if you hadn't spent your time spinning the latest Justin Timberlake or Ciara track, but that's what happens when you work in top 40 radio forever--- you become insulated.

You've never played the music really people want to hear. You fed them the music that was being fed to you by the big record labels that fed your company, and then sometimes, you unironically talked about how everything sounded like everything else!

When someone can put together a festival that brings out 10% of the metropolitan population, it's a success, no matter what you and your cynical friends may think.

You also need to check your numbers and really consider the way this works. I thought you were an expert in this?

If the city puts up 53K, which is what you claim, and sells 35K in ticket sales, then they lose 18K. However, when you consider all of the alternate sources of funding, not to mention the sponsorships, you begin to understand that the city put on a successful, two-day long festival that attracted 10% of the MSA and only lost 18K in city earmarked funds.

A festival like Quein on the Red is what most progressive cities call a quality of life event. It's a smaller scale version of Austin City Limits and NO JazzFest. Those cities post a net loss, but the overall economic impact more than makes up for the money they lose.

I am not sure if you took the time to read the CVB report that showed that last year's festival had an economic impact of over one million dollars. To most thoughtful people, the idea that a city can spend 18K in order to impact the economy with well over a million dollars is a good thing.

I suppose you believe in dissolving all city departments that aren't filling potholes or working on utility bills. Alexandria doesn't "deserve" to attract music, people, and food for a festival.

Ron, this is not only an insult to the community services department, whose main objective is self-explanatory. It's also an insult to our city.

If you had been paying attention, you would have known that the city is working on fast track, which will be filling in hundreds and hundreds of potholes, repaving numerous roads, and improving traffic flow throughout the city.

You'd also note that the city hired TEN not four new police officers.

Ron, many of us really liked and respected you, but it's past time for you to GET YOUR FACTS STRAIGHT.

Blogger said...

Wow, looks like the "angry" thing was taken a bit too far.
I have no idea what the first post is talking about. I know of no story about Ron Roberts getting terminated that was discouraged by top KALB management. If anything the story did not go very far because Mr. Roberts was not available for an interview the day the story was developed, which by the way was on the greater issue of the Riverfest possibly being trumped by Oue'in on the Red. More blogger crap with half truths. Let's get some good ideas in here or it is a waste of time.
By the way, I did not go to Que'in but I hear from participants it was fun and is growing each year, I fail to see the "smoking gun."

Spanky said...

Michelle,
The common thread I have noticed lately on most blog discussion is the line that is appearing between public (governmental) and private (free-enterprise) spending. Maybe there needs to be a discussion about what is in the governmental domain and what should be left to the private domain.

Anonymous said...

spanky, you make me laugh. you want to hold governement accountable yet anyone you perceive as being pro-government, you wish to leave to their own separate domain. no matter that many of the people in government can offer precise, on-point rebuttals to critcism leveled against them, the half-informed private sector would rather lampoon them than encourage them to participate in the conversation. Right?

Anonymous said...

Spanky is not alone in believing that government should not enter into private enterprise, and most definately to the point of ivesting public funds into a private business concern.

Spanky said...

I am pro-governement, everyone should vote, and government should do what it does best - things that a profit -driven free enterprise system cannot. Things like enforce laws fairly. Can you imagine a profit driven system of law enforcement? And streets with a toll box on every block. Get the picture?
On the flip side, we as a society have needs and desires that are fulfilled best by the free enterprise system that we refer to as our economy. Whatever the product or service, if the cost to provide is less than the cost to deliver and a (dirty word) profit can be generated for the provider there will be other providers that will try to produce a similar product to capture (dirty word) profit by competition (two or more stiving for the same goal - in this case, your money).
Imagine that you have a house fire and two competing companies show up to negotiate their fee and check your credit while your life goes up in smoke ( best done by government)or that someone from government collects money from you and your neighbors and gives it to someone else that is in the same business that you are to help them and not you (best decided by free enterprise).
What I am looking for is order in the universe, calm from chaos, personal power in all things except those where choice cannot be an option. Is that too much to ask?

Spanky said...

Hey Michelle,
Have you heard any rumors about the second set of books COA keeps on the employee hospitalization plan? 2 birdies told me that the State Police never investigated an APD referral complaint when it was tendered and the legislative auditor missed them on his last trip to town. Another thing that makes you go, HMMMMMMM. And I am just an average Joe that has these things fall out of the sky - not a reporter.

Anonymous said...

Spanky, I agree, and I think the second blogger must have misunderstood your argument.

Not everything government should be profit-driven (good point regarding the police and fire departments), and that's why when Ron Roberts et. al. state that an 18K loss at Quein on the Red is a failure, it's obvious they're missing the point.

The government doesn't always have to make money or even break even (folks, there's a difference between the private and public sector), and actually, there are some laws and/or regulations regarding government making a profit for something like Quein. The city's objective was not and should never be to make a lot of money on Quein, and like Ron Roberts said about Riverfest, that's why the city kept the ticket prices as low as possible.

I've never heard about the two sets of books. Interesting....

Sam Siamoto said...

Inquiry and Online Media: How the Public Sphere Works Better than the Private

What the local media fails to realize is that they are slowly being overtaken by the mass of blogs available that cover events in Central Louisiana. To paraphrase Jurgen Habermas, it is the strength of the argument rather than the identity of the author that leads to egalitarian thought and action. As such, the community of bloggers from the Alexandria-Pineville area have restored the sense of inquiry and argumentative positions that outlets like The Town Talk and KALB have lost.

While you can "listen" all you want, it is of utter importance for the local mass-media to take action. From the volumes of news, public conjecture, and inquiry that have come from the blogosphere I would venture to say you are losing that battle. You have lost the public sphere. What is occuring is the ascension of the public sphere in this area to cover the large gaps left forth by the mass-media. What it seems has happened is that society has been placed out of the reach of the normal citizen and the actual production of important inquiry has been left to the hands of a media that cares little to inform its viewers/readers of events that bear importance.

Again, to use Habermas as an example, the agency by which most people gather their news have been under the influence of domination for so long that any free-exchange of ideas is sequested and held without seeing the light of day. This is the main reason people have turned to alternative venues for their chance at discourse production. Sites such as CenLa Antics, CenLastir, Cenlamar, we saw that, and Paw Paws House prove to be the better house for which intelligent, fruitful discussion may take place. Some may see it as a hub for gossip and innuendo, but it provides the best, most logical outlet for citizens to express their views and to put scandal and oppression by government forces into the light.

Resources are an important part of this process and from what myself and many others can gauge--you do not have them or they are unwilling to accurately capture the public sphere. Why is this? A majority of it has to do with the quality of the news generated by the newscasters/reporters in the area. When you have a low quality set of journalists, the people recieve a lesser quality product. This is simple economics. While some reporters may be highly engaged in their profession (Billy Gunn being an example) others fail to reach that level of drive. We then get stuck with the lesser writers who cannot illustrate the importance of a news event nor are they willing to delve into the political quagmire of city politics, corruption, or misgivings. The failure of the local media and its inquiry into such events has been taken up by bloggers from this area. What does that say about the end product of the TT or KALB? When the rhetorical agency for discourse has to be created by those who normally do not delve into the world of media production.

The basic point of this post is to highlight the failure of your station and that of the local media in general. You claim that you will take action but a majority of us from the area know that will never happen. Critical inquiry into the nature of politics and scandal will always be left to the side and any discourse on the machinations of journalistic duty will be little more than empty rhetoric on your side. I'm sure you do a wonderful job in your mind BUT from the looks of things the whole of media here, whether on your end or another, are stagnant. We're overtaken by wave after wave of stories focusing on "feel-good" events that bear little cause to the overall good of the people. Because of this, any serious discussion is pushed to the wayside.

Instead of checking to see if you have the resources how about you begin to actually produce intelligent, well-defined news stories that do not focus on miniscule matters. Be at the forefront of the news instead of copying the drivel posted in The Town Talk. Investigative journalism is a lost or unknown art in this town. You have the agency, position, and overall authority to actually give the citizens of this area a view into the problems they see every day but perhaps cannot talk about themselves. You are the Fourth Estate. Act upon it. Otherwise some of us will just see the media as a bunch of do-nothings collecting a paycheck while they report on non-stories or grandma's birthday. Soon, the Fourth Estate will be overtaken by the public sphere if this keeps up.

Anonymous said...

Thank you, Sam.

This is what always gets me about the news here. They'd rather cover someone's grandmother's birthday in Deville than really invest in covering a story that has the potential of blowing the lid off of institutionalized corruption.

This week, bloggers have reawakened to the sweetheart arrangement between Bridgett Brown, Kelvin Sanders, and Myron Lawson, and instead of covering this critical part of the story, the media is more interested in giving Ms. Brown coverage for her insistent and ridiculous statements on what she "represents" on the Cleco case.

Note that Brown has never said she represents the best interests of the people of Alexandria. Instead, she wants people to know that she represents an African-American female, which she believes to be enough to qualify her to participate in one of the most important cases in our city's history.

If Brown had produced invaluable work, believe me, she would have let that be known, but if you go back and listen to the council meetings, which are now posted on wesawthat's blog (not on the Town Talk or KALB, mind you), you'll hear her talk about why it's important that someone who has the same skin color as the majority of the population is retained on the case. I caution the local media to not take the tired line of this being a racial "story," because it isn't. When you make this a story about race, you're playing directly into the divisive strategy Brown hopes will work. This story is about why Brown was appointed in the first place, what work she has done, and what she did to undermine the faith of both the mayor and the city attorney.

By reducing this as a black versus white argument, Ms. Brown is perpetuating the very type of racism she pretends to abhor. Of course, the major flaw in her argument is that she was fired by an African-American city attorney, to which one of her cronies in the city council audience responded by saying, "He ain't black."

Michelle, like Sam, I hope you invest some time into looking at the nebulous business relationships created between Lawson, Brown, Sanders, and company, and begin asking the tough questions. When the public elects someone to represent their best interests and finds out that their representative is engaging in private businesses with close associates, the city attorney, and the city's Cleco attorney, there are some serious questions that need to be asked, questions that, up until this point, have been sidestepped by the media and relegated to the blogs, which those in the media seem to arrogantly disdain (even though they have no problem fishing the blogs for other stories).

I thank you for this blog, but you are taking a risk by putting yourself on the front line. People are going to want answers. When you interviewed Mr. Lawson when he ran for council, a simple question would have been: Do you rent office space to the city attorney and to Lawyer Brown? If so, do you think this poses any potential conflict, considering the city attorney appointed Ms. Brown to the Cleco case, despite the fact that Ms. Brown has no experience in utility litigation? Or, Mr. Lawson, can you explain why your wife, Bridgette Brown, and the city attorney were all in the consulting business together last year?

All of these are valid and important questions that must be fleshed out in front of the public. Otherwise, business as usual is allowed to go on, and the public remains blissfully uninformed, and when someone like Ms. Brown is taken off of a case, the issue is so thoroughly misunderstood by the public that it is simplified as a black versus white struggle.

In a way, the failure of the media to fulfill its responsibilities allows the perpetuation of racial conflict.

I worked on this case before the new administration took over, and I understand the issues they are dealing with. To Mayor Roy, stay strong and let the truth come out. It's time for people to realize who they've elected.

Anonymous said...

The real prenant question is: if the district attorney has credible information of misconduct involving Myron Lawson, et al, and he is sworn to uphold the law and protect the public from wrong-doers, and he has the best, most effective means to investigate these well-circulated allegations, and he has the authority to address and correct these problem, WHAT IS HE DOING? HE HAS SAID THAT HE PLANS TO LOOK INTO THIS IN HIS LAST TERM WHEN RE-ELECTION IS NOT AN ISSUE, BUT ISN'T THAT MALFEASANCE ON HIS PART?

Anonymous said...

on cenla antics---

Isn't it true that Bridgett Brown represented EMS before she moved over to the City? I hear the guys at EMS didn't even know Bridgette had changed sides until they contacted her.

Seems like yet another conflict of interest......

Anonymous said...

Could get her disbarred.

Anonymous said...

With the interest seen in discussion of political corruption, and other problmes in this area, has KALB ever considered a locala version of a 60 miniutes type of investigative or expose type show? Seems from the blogs and the old IB Flying radio show that such may be so popular as to attact suffucient advertising. Such a show would also go a long way to establish the missing trust and respect for our local news reporters, and would actually be a much needed public service. The Lawson, Sanders, Brown connections would make a great start.

in your hands said...

OK Michele, half of the question is answered. We will talk to you. Will you listen to us?

Anonymous said...

Listen to this: Another simple question to ask about this Cleco stuff is: Mayor Roy, have you been paid for the legal work you provided in the Cleco-Sansing case? If not, why? If not, when?

Anonymous said...

How about another question: Why must you use bloggers to come up with simple questions that you could come up with?

Just asking is all.

Anonymous said...

Wow... listen, I think it's fair to note that MGodard IS the person behind this blog (aka "blogger") and if you wish to LIE behind your veil that's fine, dear, but I'll choose to say the truth.

Taylor Thompson was approached by a KALB reporter for a company comment and the female reporter was ROUNDLY yelled at and threatened by him; he then called KALB's general manager to INSIST the story be dropped - and it was.

Now Michelle, I credit you and the reporter for AGREEING to do the story, but don't stand up for your brass when your brass is what shut you down.

As for my availability, the reporter in question has my personal cell phone number and is in constant contact with me. She knows how to reach me and has done so any time she's needed to before. Ask her yourself.

But please, salvage some credibility by not blatantly LYING here, okay?

Anonymous said...

NOW, let me take a moment to pick apart the anonymous blogger who chose to berate me; POINT by POINT:

THEM: Ron, it's ashame you weren't able to do the media blitz you had hoped for, but you still linger on the local blogs in the hope that you can expose some non-existent corruption that only underscores how you simply don't understand what you're talking about.

Lisa Harris is a good, hard-working person who put together a festival that was more successful than any Riverfest ever was.


REPLY: First of all, I'd be WILLING to bet that Quein' lost money - not even close to breaking even - AGAIN. How is "that" successful? Secondly, even with inclement weather, Riverfest continued to thrive and survive, until the city and Quein' superceded them, chronologically on the events calendar, and got the corporate dollar thrust first.


THEM: Thankfully, she also didn't listen to naysayers like you, when you called Pat Green a washed-up country artist. Considering he packed the place on Saturday night, I'd venture to say that he is actually popular, probably more popular than you ever knew.


REPLY: I really wouldn't know if Pat Green were popular or not, being that country music isn't my forte. I actually APPLAUD Quein' for FINALLY diversifying their focur instead of just placating those on the GAEDA board and Quein' Music Committee. I mean, really... $90,000 for the Commodores in 2006? It's public record if you wish to look it up. How about $30,000 for the "United We Funk All Stars" this year? Uncle Kracker drew 6,000+ on his own for us in 2002, and he was only $20,000. And that was a steal, really. Oh, he also had a Top Ten Hit on the radio. What's "United We Funk" done, aside from please GAEDA members?


THEM: Maybe you would have known that if you hadn't spent your time spinning the latest Justin Timberlake or Ciara track, but that's what happens when you work in top 40 radio forever--- you become insulated.

You've never played the music really people want to hear. You fed them the music that was being fed to you by the big record labels that fed your company, and then sometimes, you unironically talked about how everything sounded like everything else!

REPLY: You're an idiot; first of all, the KQID playlist, in my tenure, reflected a VAST diversion from the typical Top 40 station, if you'd care to (please, again...) do your homework before spouting baseless insults. We played songs that weren't hits on any national chart MANY times, but that WERE popular with our listeners. Does the name Marc Broussard ring a bell? Never once was a song of his a Top 40 hit - not even close. His music, though, is WILDLY popluar in Cenla - NOW. He ws unknown in the area before we played him. The same could be said for "Bowling For Soup." We played music of theirs WELL before they became nationally popular. Cascada is another fine example, as was Saving Jane, who INCIDENTALLY, packed the Amphitheatre the last year of Riverfest - would you call that "successful?"

THEM: If the city puts up 53K, which is what you claim, and sells 35K in ticket sales, then they lose 18K. However, when you consider all of the alternate sources of funding, not to mention the sponsorships, you begin to understand that the city put on a successful, two-day long festival that attracted 10% of the MSA and only lost 18K in city earmarked funds.


REPLY: Alright, smarty pants. Did YOU consider the added costs I didn't EVEN bring up? Like sound and lighting, production, stage setup and breakdown and rental? How about the extra police detail? Costs are adding up still.



THEM: A festival like Quein on the Red is what most progressive cities call a quality of life event. It's a smaller scale version of Austin City Limits and NO JazzFest. Those cities post a net loss, but the overall economic impact more than makes up for the money they lose.


REPLY: Austin City Limits is a PBS funded show, far as I know, and Jazzfest ISN'T put on by the city. It's hosted by the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Organization - a non-profit organization.


THEM: I am not sure if you took the time to read the CVB report that showed that last year's festival had an economic impact of over one million dollars. To most thoughtful people, the idea that a city can spend 18K in order to impact the economy with well over a million dollars is a good thing.


REPLY: The CVB puts out blanket statements like that all the time; they're best-case-scenario reports, first off, and they usually use templates from other like-sized festivals to "guesstimate" the impact.


THEM: I suppose you believe in dissolving all city departments that aren't filling potholes or working on utility bills. Alexandria doesn't "deserve" to attract music, people, and food for a festival.


REPLY: You've read me wrong, then. The city and Pineville, as well, were involved with Riverfest, and with less taxpayer money, by the way, and that festival worked fine, mostly with corporate support (before Quein' sucked 'em dry of that), and I personally worked EVERY year with Riverfest - just fine, thank you.

Anonymous said...

The anger is just beyond belief here. Nobody cares about you. Get over it, now please. Ron, you are the new Aymond. As antics put it to him. Go away.

Anonymous said...

All hail Ron Roberts and his musical kingdom! Bow before his musical knowledge and diversity! So many bands you played on KQID became superstars! You brought in big draws to Alexandria and made oodles of money!

Ron, I solemly bow down to you O Kingmaker! Hail Ron! Ron is always right! Ron is double plus good! Let us direct our two minutes of hate towards city hall and GAEDA. They are the enemy! You, Sir, will help us in our fight to demolish the Emmanuel Goldsteins that keep our city in waste and overspending! Hail Ron!

Gaeda Thug said...

Ron makes it too easy.

NOW, let me take a moment to pick apart the anonymous blogger who chose to berate me; POINT by POINT:

THEM: Ron, it's ashame you weren't able to do the media blitz you had hoped for, but you still linger on the local blogs in the hope that you can expose some non-existent corruption that only underscores how you simply don't understand what you're talking about.

Lisa Harris is a good, hard-working person who put together a festival that was more successful than any Riverfest ever was.


REPLY: First of all, I'd be WILLING to bet that Quein' lost money - not even close to breaking even - AGAIN. How is "that" successful? Secondly, even with inclement weather, Riverfest continued to thrive and survive, until the city and Quein' superceded them, chronologically on the events calendar, and got the corporate dollar thrust first.

THEM (again): Ron, I know this may come to a shock to you, but sometimes, cities don't have to make money on everything they do. Sometimes, cities hold festivals and events that bring people together, and it doesn't matter if they make $15,000 or lose $15,000. The overall economic impact for Quein on the Red was in the seven figures. Call Sherry Smith and ask her yourself.

THEM: Thankfully, she also didn't listen to naysayers like you, when you called Pat Green a washed-up country artist. Considering he packed the place on Saturday night, I'd venture to say that he is actually popular, probably more popular than you ever knew.


REPLY: I really wouldn't know if Pat Green were popular or not, being that country music isn't my forte. I actually APPLAUD Quein' for FINALLY diversifying their focur instead of just placating those on the GAEDA board and Quein' Music Committee. I mean, really... $90,000 for the Commodores in 2006? It's public record if you wish to look it up. How about $30,000 for the "United We Funk All Stars" this year? Uncle Kracker drew 6,000+ on his own for us in 2002, and he was only $20,000. And that was a steal, really. Oh, he also had a Top Ten Hit on the radio. What's "United We Funk" done, aside from please GAEDA members?

THEM (again): Ron, which is it? Did the city spend 55K, 70K, 65K, 100K, or 90K? You can't seem to get your facts straight no matter how hard you try, buddy. No one spent 35K on United We Funk All-Stars. Are you just pulling these numbers out of thin air? Or are you just drunk? Maybe you're drunk. Uncle Kracker sounds good to you, after all.

THEM: Maybe you would have known that if you hadn't spent your time spinning the latest Justin Timberlake or Ciara track, but that's what happens when you work in top 40 radio forever--- you become insulated.

You've never played the music really people want to hear. You fed them the music that was being fed to you by the big record labels that fed your company, and then sometimes, you unironically talked about how everything sounded like everything else!

REPLY: You're an idiot; first of all, the KQID playlist, in my tenure, reflected a VAST diversion from the typical Top 40 station, if you'd care to (please, again...) do your homework before spouting baseless insults. We played songs that weren't hits on any national chart MANY times, but that WERE popular with our listeners. Does the name Marc Broussard ring a bell? Never once was a song of his a Top 40 hit - not even close. His music, though, is WILDLY popluar in Cenla - NOW. He ws unknown in the area before we played him. The same could be said for "Bowling For Soup." We played music of theirs WELL before they became nationally popular. Cascada is another fine example, as was Saving Jane, who INCIDENTALLY, packed the Amphitheatre the last year of Riverfest - would you call that "successful?"

THEM (again): WOW! You are truly a hit maker. If it weren't for you, major label recording artists like Saving Jane, Bowling for Soup, and Lafayette's own Marc Broussard would probably still be playing in someone's garage or at some NSU frat party. I just called my friend from Bowling for Soup. Your royalty check is in the mail.

THEM: If the city puts up 53K, which is what you claim, and sells 35K in ticket sales, then they lose 18K. However, when you consider all of the alternate sources of funding, not to mention the sponsorships, you begin to understand that the city put on a successful, two-day long festival that attracted 10% of the MSA and only lost 18K in city earmarked funds.


REPLY: Alright, smarty pants. Did YOU consider the added costs I didn't EVEN bring up? Like sound and lighting, production, stage setup and breakdown and rental? How about the extra police detail? Costs are adding up still.

THEM (again): Yes, yes I did. That's why there were sponsors for the festival.

THEM: A festival like Quein on the Red is what most progressive cities call a quality of life event. It's a smaller scale version of Austin City Limits and NO JazzFest. Those cities post a net loss, but the overall economic impact more than makes up for the money they lose.


REPLY: Austin City Limits is a PBS funded show, far as I know, and Jazzfest ISN'T put on by the city. It's hosted by the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Organization - a non-profit organization.

THEM (again): Austin City Limits THE TELEVISION SHOW is put on by PBS, but Austin City Limits, THE FESTIVAL, is sponsored in part by the City of Austin. NO Jazzfest is set up the same way Quein on the Red is. A non-profit company called Alexandria Festival Organization collects money from the city and the sponsors.

THEM: I am not sure if you took the time to read the CVB report that showed that last year's festival had an economic impact of over one million dollars. To most thoughtful people, the idea that a city can spend 18K in order to impact the economy with well over a million dollars is a good thing.


REPLY: The CVB puts out blanket statements like that all the time; they're best-case-scenario reports, first off, and they usually use templates from other like-sized festivals to "guesstimate" the impact.

THEM(again): Weak sauce, Ron. Weak sauce.

THEM: I suppose you believe in dissolving all city departments that aren't filling potholes or working on utility bills. Alexandria doesn't "deserve" to attract music, people, and food for a festival.


REPLY: You've read me wrong, then. The city and Pineville, as well, were involved with Riverfest, and with less taxpayer money, by the way, and that festival worked fine, mostly with corporate support (before Quein' sucked 'em dry of that), and I personally worked EVERY year with Riverfest - just fine, thank you.

THEM (again): Call your fearless board and ask them why Riverfest failed. Ask them the real reasons. I also worked on Riverfest, Ron. There are many things you don't know and couldn't have known. Quein on the Red was the least of their concerns.

Anonymous said...

I'm "over" it quite fine, thankyaverymuch. The mission of this blog was to "tell" the Cenla media what they are and aren't doing right, so I gave my two cents' worth.

So then I answered a mis-informed critic.

So long as my viewpoints are mis-represented, I'll retort with the corrections.

I've moved out of the area, as well; ready to take another station to the top of the ratings, as well as involve myself in the community to raise money for childrens' health needs, to collect toys for needy kids at Christmas, to coach youth sports, to work in cooperation with local organizations to promote their missions like blood drives, stamping out hunger, and participating with local festival organizers to bring the entire community together in celebration.

Alexandria can keep its shady politics, its feeble community services division and its inept upper management keeping media coverage from shining a light on the truth in that area.

Anonymous said...

Ron, while you're helping the children and celebrating celebrations, I'll be fighting third world AIDS, raising awareness for childhood diseases, solving the global warming crisis, staring in major motion pictures, cleaning up crime, and when I have time I'll make my way to the station so I can put on the newest Beyonce song. Because Beyonce can heal the world.

Anonymous said...

Ron, it's not hard to take a radio station to the top in this market. The people here are cattle and will go whereever the herd go. I mean, come on, Michelle's tv station is top rated and it sucks!

I know several people who do all of the above "accomplishments and service" without whoring themselves for time and notice. Just give up, Ron. Look for that sad, sorry light and walk into it. All your bluster is nothing more than a veil to hide behind the pathetic level of insight, research, and respect you possess.

The message is clear: You constantly misrepresent the facts. When you come back with proof, maybe we'll play ball and show you some respect. Then again, it is you Ron, we'll just snicker as you blabber on about corruption and scandal. You wouldn't know a good news story unless Billy Gunn wrote about it first.

RonRoberts said...

First off, I didn't write the second post yesterday that appeared to have come from me, and I don't participate in non-work community functions because I seek some sort of glory or honor from it. That'd be the wrong reason to do so; now, there are those in the media industry who are "obligated" to give of their time and energy through their job because their company seeks the exposure and/or has to fulfill Federal Communications Commission guidelines for community involvement. But I'm not going to sit here and nitpick over what I invested my time, energy and emotion in to decipher what was "mandated" and what was of my own free will. Those I've worked with, worked for, and collaborated with, along with myself, know the story and it doesn't need to be validated by random bloggers. I'm more than very comfortable with the sincerity of my intentions. I'm sure the same can be said of the intentions of those who mock and/or deride, as well.


I will, however disagree with the malcontent who said: "Ron, it's not hard to take a radio station to the top in this market. The people here are cattle and will go whereever the herd go. I mean, come on, Michelle's tv station is top rated and it sucks!"


First off, there are only five "local" television stations in Alexandria, and only one with actual local news; According to radio-locator.com, there are 22 radio stations serving Alexandria, La. So there's a good bit of competition in the radio industry.

Secondly, and without making your eyes go glossy with more information than you can probably consume about my business, markets like Alexandria aren't easy for pop/top 40 radio stations to thrive in. Country music is a predominant choice in a small/rural market, and even then, urban-oriented radio stations are given sort of a grading curve by Arbitron to off-set radio advertising bias by those who purchase the airtime. In essence, you usually an urban-formatted station and/or country station at the top. In fact, KQID was tied for #1 overall in the market, last fall, by, you guessed it, a country station.

Carry on with your witless insults all you wish; there are those who ready them for the bitter, tactless, baseless venom that they are. Then there's you, who I'm sure gets off on your childish put-downs as your one brush with some sort of fame you sadly wish to strive for.